Friday, December 7, 2007

Mitt's Deal With The Devil

As a Mormon missionary, I learned alot about Mormon doctrine and how it contrasted with mainstream or Nicene Christianity as well as other faiths. I also learned just how sensitive people could be when their beliefs were challenged. A tactic to reduce the tension during a hot theological discussion was to search for some common ground, and take on a common "enemy." When "born-againers" as we called them would challenge me, I'd find common ground tearing into the dogmas of the Jehovah's Witnesses. When dealing with a "jaydub" as we called them, I'd tear into "born-againer's" dogma.

This is what Mitt Romney did in his inexcusable affront to our Republic in his speech yesterday. By tearing into atheists, non-believers and others and calling them members of the "religion of secularism", Mitt sought to gain friends by claiming a common enemy. Mitt has sold his soul to the devil of theocratic Republicanism, a Republicanism that claims that America's birthright is given only to those who believe in God. He has shown that he wishes to use the apparatus and resources of the state to promote religion, atleast as it pertains to the common ground he feels with the Christian right.

Mitt and his fellow Mormons continue to crawl on the cross, claiming persecution and discrimination. Why wouldn't anyone vote for a Mormon? I for the record have said I would vote for a Mormon for President. But after watching Mitt's speech, I can categorically say, if I vote for a Mormon for President, it sure as hell won't be Mitt.

9 comments:

Frank Staheli said...

I have a different perspective on this topic over at Simple Utah Mormon Politics. There is no problem with someone being secular (agnostic, atheistic?). The problem is when they turn it into a religion and thereby exclude (usually through the power of government) others from freely practicing their own faiths.

I am naive (and I've learned not to be too embarrassed by it), but I didn't think Mitt was trying to make enemies of atheists.

Obi wan liberali said...

I have a different interpretation of what Mitt was saying. There are many theists of all sorts who would like the government to be the promoter of their religious values or ideas. Wanting to put up plaques of the ten commandments is a prime example "what commanding us not to covet" has to do with the role of government I'm not sure.

To call secularism a religion is like calling a cow type of horse. Atheism isn't a religion, it is a philosophy that does not believe in religion.

The Christian right continues to posture around about how God has been taken out of government. They don't want government to be neutral on the issue of religion, they want government to promote their brand of religion. Mitt appealled to that desire by siding with them and calling secularism something it is not.

I rarely agree with Rocky Anderson, but in this case, I do believe Mitt was being disingenuous.

Cyrom said...

You sure have a strange way of building relationships of trust. I do not remember this tactic being taught in the Mission Training Center.

Jeff f

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Obi wan liberali said...

Jeff f

We were taught this tactic at a Zone Conference by the Mission President. He was concerned about the number of heated confrontations his missionaries were facing by devout members of other faiths. He proposed this tactic, and frankly I became rather good at using it.

I may have bad-talked other religions, but I walked away with people who didn't view me as much of an enemy as they did before.

Thanks for visiting Jeff f. I'm honored by your presence. Best regards.

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